Please ensure Javascript is enabled for purposes of website accessibility

3 Questions to Ask If You Want Custom Furniture

Post by 
Noosha Hodges
June 30, 2020
August 2, 2021

Custom furniture can make your business and its offices look unique. While custom furniture can improve your aesthetic, you need to ask some questions before you purchase any. Otherwise, you may purchase the wrong type of furniture and it won't benefit you. Make sure you ask these three questions before you buy custom furniture.

What type of furniture do I need?

While custom furniture should look nice, you also need to pick something practical. For example, you may need some new desks or cabinets depending on the situation. Think about what your business needs and look into furniture that will provide that assistance.

What vibe do I want the business to give?

Custom furniture gives you an excellent opportunity to have the exact aesthetic you want. With this in mind, you need to make sure you get custom furniture that will have the same vibe and feel you want for your business. Otherwise, it will cause a serious clash that could affect the way your employees or clients perceive the business.

How can I use custom furniture to make the business more welcoming?

No matter what aesthetic you want to go for, you need to make it welcoming. When you invite a client to visit your business or the office, you should make them feel comfortable. Otherwise, they may not want to do business with you. Focus on getting custom furniture that will feel and look comfortable.

Conclusion

Some businesses may overlook furniture, but it can help your business with its customers. Whether you need something practical or for aesthetics, you can get different types of custom furniture that will meet your needs. Asking yourself these questions will help you look into the right types of custom furniture. If you need to figure out where you can get custom furniture, you can always contact us.

THere's More
Inspiration
Sep
14
June 30, 2020
2021

Passion Project - An Interview with Jason Betty

Betty is a Sr. Industrial Engineer within the Studio Other Team. His passion to create is what initially led him to Studio Other, and what continues to drive his hobbies outside of the office. Currently, you’ll find him busy making hand-strung art and custom cutting boards using recycled leftover materials from Studio Other projects. Beyond art-related interests, Betty loves camping, anything involving nature and costume contests.
Design
Aug
24
June 30, 2020
2021

Quality Control With Stephanie Bonilla

Stephanie is the Operations Manager within the Studio Other team. Her favorite aspects of her job are collaborating with amazing people and seeing initial design inspiration turned into reality. On the weekends, you’ll find Stephanie spending time with her family and occasionally adding to her tattoo collection.
Design
Aug
9
June 30, 2020
2021

Office Design Ideas That Can Boost Productivity and Employee Satisfaction

Some of the most critical office space issues include noise pollution, screen privacy, and work space that accommodates both privacy and collaboration. Here are some office design ideas that can help overcome these issues. 
Design
Jul
26
June 30, 2020
2021

6 Factors to Consider When Designing an Office

Developing an efficient office design and layout can be a challenging undertaking. Here are some important elements to consider when planning an office design.
Trends
Jul
15
June 30, 2020
2021

Digital Tools Open Opportunities for Innovation in the Custom Furniture Industry

Studio Other is made up of a diverse group of creatives, makers and builders who value the art of craftmanship both within and beyond their job description. In the time spent outside of the office, you’ll find many of our people working on their artistic endeavors, crafting primarily with their hands and using various mediums. In what feels like a lifetime ago, our team was working on Studio Other projects in a similar manner, drawing up sketches on pen and paper and presenting every idea and revision in person. While there’s certainly a level of nostalgic appeal in using analog methods, the bottom line is that they allowed for slow turnaround, inefficient manufacturing and room for error.